What Matters?

The thoughts and conclusions of Miss Matters...
-Arts3091 Advanced Media Issues-

The Future…

To finish up for my final blog post, I think I’d like to make a few final statements about what I have taken from ARTS3091…

1.   The Internet is the vanguard of the new media revolution.

2.   New media has blurred the divide between creator and consumer, thus essentially everyone is apart of the media.

3.   New media has completely changed the archetype of media consumption.

4.   The future of new media, in regards to social and cultural change holds much excitement and anticipation… I know I cant wait to see what’s to come!

Now to put that into the context of this weeks readings and lecture on the future…. I thought I would highlight the distinguishing factors of “new media” versus “old media”: as the interactive power of modern information technology platforms. The dynamic nature of “new media” content carries the promise of democratising both creation and distribution of media matter. Due to the fact that new media is largely digital, the term isn’t solely focused on digitized content, but mainly on the interactive relationship between the creator and the consumer. The main potential of new media is the revolutionisation of the media industry and the transformation of societies habits and media consumption patterns.

This Infographic illustrates when media is consumed across different generations. Young or old, the advancements in technology have found their ways to cater to all generations. Parents now have the use of Facebook, Twitter and other social networks to communicate with not only their children but their relatives as well. I think its truly  amazing to see how far along we’ve come in terms of communication and connection. Perhaps we have the advancement of media and technology to thank for that, no one could have predicted such a following 10 years ago and so even now we can not predict the future of media only hope that it will bring something even better.

Basically the way I see it is that the many facets of online media technologies are fast changing the way people consume and learn. The evolution of media has widened people’s grasp on technology and it’s different uses. Through the advent of the Internet and other new media an infinite amount of possibilities have been created, and more than ever the regular Joe is expressing him/herself in a new dimension. The future should not scare, instead we should embrace it. 

Blog #8- Week 11 Generative

Sources:
MBA Online (2011) Generational Media Consumption 2011 (Infographic).  http://www.famousbloggers.net/generational-media-consumption-infographic.html Accessed 13 May 2012

Stanford University, Press Release, April 21st 2000. http://www.stanford.edu/group/siqss/Press_Release/, Last viewed 25th September. 


Hmmm Science, Technology, innovation and Society?

“At the core of science’s self-modification is technology. New tools enable new ways of discovery, different ways of structuring information. We call that organization knowledge. With technological innovations the structure of our knowledge evolves. The achievement of science is to discover new things; the evolution of science is to organize the discoveries in new ways. Even the organization of our tools themselves is a type of knowledge. Right now, with the advance of communication technology and computers, we have entered a new way of knowing” (Kelly, 2010). 

It seems to me that new media has become a hub which connects and helps the evolution of science, technology, politics and society. Media is constantly evolving itself and in such diverse schools of thought that it has allowed for greater involvement and understanding across the board. But is this necessarily a good thing? The capabilities of new media to transform science and the way in which it is conducted are far-reaching and extend throughout the field; new media and technologies shape the way that experiments are run, visualised and modelled, providing new methods and techniques that work towards attaining an understanding of the inner workings of the human body, the environment, different plants and animals and even the workings of the universe at large.

Another aspect of science that is changed by new media are the opportunities for and the challenges of communicating, distributing and sharing ones findings. Through new communication methods such as the digitization of scientific publications, blogging and podcasts, science has become more accessible and transparent, not only within the field itself but for the public as well. Pisani (2011) acknowledges that new innovations in scientific data sharing allowed by new media “will mean more and faster progress… and better quality data” and Wilbanks (2011) also notes that “the internet is poised to transform science publishing and science itself”. These new innovations place an emphasis on sharing and can thus be related to the concepts of micropolitics and collaboration we discussed last week, as scientists would be able to freely and efficiently access and add to scientific data from all over the world, providing a comprehensive database of information that may assist in further discovery. However, as Pisani explores in her article, it doesn’t only mean good things. It does in fact mean giving away your ideas and your work, where your data can be taken, used and published by someone else: “Since published papers are virtually the only measure of success in my job, that’s like giving away my future.” (2011)

So, today’s society, thanks to new media forms, can now be more involved… But, is it necessarily a positive thing that our society can read the ins and outs of scientific experiments? Are we equipped to cope and even understand this influx of scientific data? Whilst other experts can use this open scientific data to help the progression of an experiment etc what good does it do us as a society? Most likely we will interpret the information wrongly and think something drastic like there is a flu epidemic in the whole world! Ahhhhh! So where exactly do we fit in this situation? I understand what the positives and negatives Pisani describes are for the scientific world. But I’m just not sure that we as a society can or should have a say on these topics or why would it be important for us to be able to read this scientific information if there is just no way the ‘Everyman’ is going to understand it? Maybe my venn diagram will help you feel what I am feeling about this one…



Blog #7- Week 10

SOURCES:
Kelly, Kevin (2010) ‘Evolving the Scientific Method: Technology is changing the way we conduct science’, The Scientist <http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/57831/>

Pisani, Elizabeth (2011) ‘Medical science will benefit from the research of crowds’, The Guardian, January 11, <http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2011/jan/11/medical-research-data-sharing>

Wilbanks, John (2011) ‘On Science Publishing’, Seed, <http://seedmagazine.com/content/article/on_science_publishing>

Egypt’s Twitterlution…. “Big Politics- The Fate of the State”

Egypt's Twitterlution

As we watch media and technology create new forms of online communication and distribution for the masses we are also observing major shifts in the way that today’s society can be organised- both in politics and governance. Egypt’s 2011 Revolution is a great example of how an oppressed society was able to organise themselves to revolt by instrumentally utilising social media. The people of Egypt were able to overthrow a corrupt government by effectively using the online social media tools available to them. I think it is important to note that the organising was orchestrated in such a way that it allowed the people of Egypt to feel united. The origins of this unified front began with a Facebook page created in honour of Khaled Said, a young man who had been beaten and killed by the police. “This page became a focal point around which 470,000 “fans” organised their dissidence.” (Mainwaring, 2011)

 I am in no way saying that social media was the only reason the Egyptian people were able to revolt, what I wish to point out is that without the aid of social media the revolution would have been a much longer and arduous process for the Egyptian activists. More than 70,000 Egyptians signed up to Facebook saying that they would attend the protest. The hashtag #Jan25 was created to help spread information about the action planned for January 25th 2011 in Tahrir Square. Asma Mahfouz a young Egyptian activist posted a YouTube video beseeching her fellow people to begin protesting. These are all poignant examples of how social media helped assemble and organise Egypt’s subjugated population.

Underlining all of this are the reactions from the Egyptian activists themselves, when asked what they were taking photos of during a rally, a young man replied: “Ourselves. Our revolution. We put it on Facebook, It’s how we tell the world what’s happening.” (Beaumont, 2011) The Egyptian government could not stand against such a well organised force. “The absence of structure, leadership and formal organisation, once considered a weakness has become an asset… The rules of the game have changed.” (Brafman and Beckstrom, 2011) And so it seems the rules HAVE changed. The Egyptian Revolution is just one of the many Arabic revolts which have proven that political organisation can be effectively executed in the most unlikely forums. It serves as a warning to any government that is not serving the interests of their people. The Internet it seems, is a machine to be feared, for oppressive rulers.

Blog #6. Week 8.

SOURCES:

Beaumont, P. (2011). The Truth about Twitter, Facebook and the Uprisings in the Arab World. The Guardian UK. com. http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/feb/25/twitter-facebook-uprisings-arab-libya?intcmp=239 - Cited, 23rd April 2012

Brafman and Beckstrom (2010), The Power of a Leaderless Organizations,http://www.nationaljournal.com/njonline/the-power-of-leaderless-organizations-20100911- Cited, 23rd April 2012

Mainwaring, S. (2011). “Exactly What Role Did Social Media Play in the Egyptian Revolution?” The We First Blog. http://simonmainwaring.com/facebook/exactly-what-role-did-social-media-play-in-the-egyptian-revolution/ - Cited, 22nd April 2012

Image Source:
http://www.tednguyenusa.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Twitter-Egypt-revolution.jpg


FRAMING & TRANSVERSALITY- 

I’m not normally one to get excited over concert gimmicks (or rap artists) but I have to say I was pretty impressed by the holographic technology used by the Coachella organisers to “resurrect” 2Pac. This ties into many aspects of what Andrew Murphie has been explaining to us about framing and transversality (also in relation to music). The frame or structure of a live performance has been completely transversed by the re-creation of a dead artist through the use of holographic technology. This technology has produced something new and dynamic from two different frames. The first frame to acknowledge is ‘live performance’ and the second is ‘death’ (seems a bit somber, I know… but lets not focus on that). Both of these frames have been meshed together or crossed over to create a new form of performance.

This leaves the viewer to wonder just how far this new transversality can go- What has become clear to me on further exploration into this performance, is that there seems to be an intrinsic response for some to shy away from the unknown. One person from the US responded to this gimmick with alarming thoughts about what the government’s capabilities are with such a technology. Another person even responded to this use video post saying that he thought the government “use mind control to maintain order in society” (nuclearshadow12, 2012) Both people have jumped to conclusions about a topic unconcerned with the ‘performance’ itself. I am aware that this is an extreme case, but I do think it’s important to be aware of the extremes when exploring a new transversal or any new technology for that matter. This is because what is shown in the media is soaked up by millions of people across the world, and any one of those millions could be extremists. Significantly I think that this entire situation has raised valid points on the validity of what is portrayed in media and more specifically how it ‘should’ be portrayed.

This performance is an illustration of a ‘technogenic’ event, in which occurrences are made possible by the changing uses of technology (Murphie, 2006). Events such as Coachella Music Festival, where they have showcased such an innovative technology, and not only in a physical arena but also now online, is a clear indication of the available opportunities for greater creative collaboration. It is obvious to me that music and technology industries are not dying but rather evolving or transforming to take on new forms in their own rights. But I think it is very important to be sure that these ‘new forms’ have legitimate standing within today’s world.

(Ps. I am in no way saying that I agree with what the extremists have said regarding the implications of holographic technology or that it is not a legitimate media form or transversal. Only that everyone sees these BIG things and people react in such diverse ways. SO those who have control of the new media forms should be aware of the implications of their release in today’s culture.)

Blog #5. Week 7.

SOURCES:

Murphie, Andrew (2006) ‘Editorial’, [on transversality], the Fibreculture Journal, 9 <http://nine.fibreculturejournal.org/>

Tupac Hologram Full Performance Coachella (2012), http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ajVGIRsKXdo

Tupac Hologram Full Performance Coachella Reaction Video - MC Sincere (2012) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7XHVfIkio6Y&feature=related

Nuclearshadow12- (2012) Youtube comment on- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7XHVfIkio6Y&feature=related

Is it reality? Virtual, actual? Sensation, perception?

3D Project-Mapping: In this video we watch how Samsung use 3D visualisation to awe the crowds. This is a fantastic way to distort perception that is amazingly attention grabbing, It definitely does the trick for me; particularly because i feel like it keeps me guessing.  This 3D projection is a great way to test your sensations, your perceptions, and your ideologies behind what you have always known as virtual and real. It begs the viewer to ask themselves; how do we know what is real? It is interesting that this video also shows the audiences’ reactions to the visualisation, we can distinguish many different reactions exhibited on their expressions, from astonishment, to enjoyment and many in-between. 

This video attracts and appeals to all my sense, it awes me, it intrigues me and it is compelling in such a mysterious way. Astonishingly it connects both the virtual and real world through… A simulation… This video shows how a 3D representation can push the boundaries of reality by forcing the interaction between human sensation and perception through visual elements or ‘virtuality’. This asks the viewer to distinguish the real from fantasy in a mixed representation of a real world brick building and a visualisation trick. This media form messes about and extends our pre-composed notions of a real world experience. 

Blog #4: Week 5

REFERENCE:

Advertising Revolution, entire building turned into 3D TV’s, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-HBDBRiy8Qc Viewed April 6th 2011.

 

I really enjoyed this weeks topic on mnemotechnics, memory, thinking and action. Much of the information I read helped me to build upon thoughts I had previously had on the topic.I really related to David Chalmers’ analysis of technology as serving as an extended mind, using technology to expand the natural capacities of the human body. I continued to follow up on this thought process and I found this fantastic RSA animate which I thought explored and built upon the readings for this weeks topic.

Ian McGilchrist explains that our divided brain has two ‘hemisphere’s’; the right and the left, and they profoundly alter human behaviour, culture and society. What McGilchrist describes about the left and right function of the mind embodies the actions and reactions of human beings, depending on what side of the brain’s ‘hemisphere’ we are listening to and acting upon. What interests me the most about McGilchrist’s theory is that with each new generation our brains are constantly evolving (evolution), then I thought about the fact that with each new generation comes new technology and social and cultural advancements. So to me this ideology behind the ‘brain’s two hemisphere’s’ seems a really good starting point to prove that the brain develops, adapts and in theory evolves in correlation to new media technologies. Is it possible that new technology attempts to embody aspects of the ‘brains two hemisphere’s’ to give a more intuitive experience… Or even a controlling experience, as Veronica Pamoukaghlian explores in her article about ‘Science’s attempts at thought control’. Why the brain functions in these ways is something I think people can only ever theorise about, there are so many possibilities, however, one common theme is that the brain will continue to evolve. So how will we ever know? I suppose this is something that just wont ever have ONE correct answer… 

Blog #3: Week 4

Sources:

RSA Animate, Ian McGilchrist: The Divided Brain. October 2011 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1h9CoT9rzDg

Link to David Chalmers talk on the Extended Mind: June, 2009http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8S149IVHhmc

This comic reel on George Orwell&#8217;s 1984 and Huxley&#8217;s A Brave New World is a great example of influential writings on the relationship of media, society and culture.  
The depiction of the nostalgia for what was (before a &#8216;new form media&#8217; existed) is evident in this comic as is the negative effect of the evolution of technology on society. This theory is at the crux of what Orwell and Huxley wrote their novels on and many theorists, before and since, have continued to deconstruct this major issue with the evolution of media.
Media are now affected by their changing contexts as they increasingly move through space and time. There is constantly more change as media collide with other media, other cultural contexts that use them differently, and of course, by increasingly rapid technological innovation. But it seems that the same principle worry that Orwell and Huxley had, underpin many of the theories on the influences of changes in Media.  
So I think it would be fair to say that media innovation really has had some major influences on society. As seen by the popularity of both books 1984 and Brave New World, although neither changed the fact that technology advanced, they both created an awareness and understanding of the effects of technology on society and culture. It seems to me that both of these highly regarded novels depict theories of Media Ecology. 

Source:Stuart McMillan, May 2009- Amusing Ourselves to Death http://www.recombinantrecords.net/docs/2009-05-Amusing-Ourselves-to-Death.htmlPost # 2&#8212; posting on week 3 topic 

This comic reel on George Orwell’s 1984 and Huxley’s A Brave New World is a great example of influential writings on the relationship of media, society and culture.  

The depiction of the nostalgia for what was (before a ‘new form media’ existed) is evident in this comic as is the negative effect of the evolution of technology on society. This theory is at the crux of what Orwell and Huxley wrote their novels on and many theorists, before and since, have continued to deconstruct this major issue with the evolution of media.

Media are now affected by their changing contexts as they increasingly move through space and time. There is constantly more change as media collide with other media, other cultural contexts that use them differently, and of course, by increasingly rapid technological innovation. But it seems that the same principle worry that Orwell and Huxley had, underpin many of the theories on the influences of changes in Media.  

So I think it would be fair to say that media innovation really has had some major influences on society. As seen by the popularity of both books 1984 and Brave New World, although neither changed the fact that technology advanced, they both created an awareness and understanding of the effects of technology on society and culture. It seems to me that both of these highly regarded novels depict theories of Media Ecology. 

Source:
Stuart McMillan, May 2009- Amusing Ourselves to Death http://www.recombinantrecords.net/docs/2009-05-Amusing-Ourselves-to-Death.html

Post # 2— posting on week 3 topic 

For my first blog post I have incorporated aspects of our first two lectures by visually representing my own personal &#8216;Media Transformation&#8217;. The timeline/mindmap depicts the main media forms I have practiced in chronological order, whilst also representing the cultural and social media changes within my lifetime. The shift from the use of computer to laptop not only shows technological advancement but also depicts how the computer has become obsolete for me (this is the same for the telephone to mobile). The timeline can also be seen as a real life example of Marshall McLuhan&#8217;s theory of &#8220;the medium is the message&#8221;. This visual works as a reflection (albeit short and constrained) of the constant innovations and bettering of existing technologies which have altered my own personal media usage; proving what I have left behind and also adapted as social norms. 
Week One 

For my first blog post I have incorporated aspects of our first two lectures by visually representing my own personal ‘Media Transformation’. The timeline/mindmap depicts the main media forms I have practiced in chronological order, whilst also representing the cultural and social media changes within my lifetime. The shift from the use of computer to laptop not only shows technological advancement but also depicts how the computer has become obsolete for me (this is the same for the telephone to mobile). The timeline can also be seen as a real life example of Marshall McLuhan’s theory of “the medium is the message”. This visual works as a reflection (albeit short and constrained) of the constant innovations and bettering of existing technologies which have altered my own personal media usage; proving what I have left behind and also adapted as social norms. 


Week One 

It’s a NEW year, but it’s the SAME blog!

Last year we blogged for Andrew’s subject ARTS2090 and this tumblr. page worked very well for me. So I’ve decided to continue on with it for this year’s blogging component.

Stay tuned for what is surely to come!

Question 2:

How is the diminution of traditional, and often hierarchical, “authoritative” intermediaries changing the role of publishing in social life?

(Ive never made an animation before! Sorry for any of the bad glitches, they happened during the upload! I did the best I could with this project- ENJOY)